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Posts Tagged ‘Diabetes mellitus type 2’

How physically active is the U.S. population?

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on September 12, 2012 at 1:05 pm

 How physically active is the U.S. population?

 

 Only 31 percent of U.S. adults report that they engage in regular leisure-time physical activity (defined as either three sessions per week of vigorous physical activity lasting 20 minutes or more, or five sessions per week of light-to-moderate physical activity lasting 30 minutes or more). About 40 percent of adults report no leisure-time physical activity.

About 35 percent of high school students report that they participate in at least 60 minutes of physical activity on 5 or more days of the week, and only 30 percent of students report that they attend physical education class daily. As children get older, participation in regular physical activity decreases dramatically.

In contrast to reported activity, when physical activity is measured by a device that detects movement, only about 3–5 percent of adults obtain 30 minutes of moderate or greater intensity physical activity on at least 5 days per week. Among youth, measured activity provides information on younger children than is available with reports and highlights the decline in activity from childhood to adolescence. For example, 42 percent of children age 6–11 obtain the recommended 60 minutes per day of physical activity, whereas only 8 percent of adolescents achieve this goal.

What are the benefits of physical activity?

Research suggests that physical activity may reduce the risk of many adverse health conditions, such as coronary heart disease, stroke, some cancers, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, and depression. In addition, physical activity can help reduce risk factors for conditions such as high blood pressure and blood cholesterol. Researchers believe that some physical activity is better than none, and additional health benefits can be gained by increasing the frequency, intensity, and duration of physical activity.

 

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Pre-Diabetes: Control it before it becomes a Monster

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on August 22, 2012 at 8:00 am

Did you know if you are 45 years old or older, overweight, and inactive, you may have prediabetes?

What is prediabetes?

Prediabetes means you have blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Glucose is a form of sugar your body uses for energy. Too much glucose in your blood can damage your body over time. Prediabetes is also called impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT).

If you have prediabetes, you are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Being overweight and physically inactive contributes to prediabetes. You can sometimes reverse prediabetes with weight loss that comes from healthy eating and physical activity.

How do I know if I have prediabetes?

Most people with prediabetes don’t have any symptoms. Your doctor can test your blood to find out if your blood glucose levels are higher than normal.

Who should be tested for prediabetes?

If you are 45 years old or older, your doctor may recommend that you be tested for prediabetes, especially if you are overweight. Being overweight means your body mass index (BMI) is over 25. BMI is a measure of your weight relative to your height. If you’re not sure, ask your doctor if you are overweight.

Even if you are younger than 45, consider getting tested if you are overweight and

  • are physically active less than three times a week
  • have a parent, brother, or sister with diabetes
  • have high blood pressure
  • have abnormal levels of HDL cholesterol or triglycerides, two types of blood fats
  • had gestational diabetes-diabetes during pregnancy-or gave birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds
  • are African American, American Indian, Hispanic/Latino, Asian American, or Pacific Islander
  • have polycystic ovary syndrome
  • have dark, thick, velvety skin around your neck or in your armpits
  • have blood vessel problems affecting your heart, brain, or legs

If the results are normal, you should be retested in 3 years. If you have prediabetes, you should be tested for type 2 diabetes every year or two.

What can I do about prediabetes?

Losing weight-at least 5 to 10 percent of your starting weight-can prevent or delay diabetes or even reverse prediabetes. That’s 10 to 20 pounds for someone who weighs 200 pounds. You can lose weight by cutting down on the amount of calories and fat you consume and being physically active at least 30 minutes a day. Physical activity also helps make your body’s insulin work better.

Ask your doctor if you should also take medicine to help control the amount of glucose in your blood.

The National Diabetes Education Program’s “Small Steps. Big Rewards. Prevent type 2 Diabetes” campaign has more information about preventing diabetes.

Active at Any Size Day 3: Get Started

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on August 3, 2012 at 8:00 am

 

How do I get started?

◆Start slowly. Your body needs time to get used to your new activity.

◆Warm up. Warm-ups get your body ready for action. Shrug your shoulders, tap your toes, swing your arms, or march in place. Walk more slowly for the first few minutes.

◆Cool down. Slow down little by little. If you have been walking fast, walk slowly for a few minutes to cool down. Cooling down may protect your heart, relax your muscles, and keep you from getting hurt.

Appreciate yourself!

If you cannot do an activity, do not be hard on yourself. Feel good about what you can do. Be proud of pushing yourself up out of a chair or walking a short distance.

Pat yourself on the back for trying even if you cannot do it the first time. It may be easier the next time!

How do I continue to be active?

TO maintain your active lifestyle, try these suggestions:

◆Pledge to be active. Making a commitment to yourself to be active may help you stay motivated, stay on track, and reach your goals. Consider using the activity pledge at the end of this booklet to help you start and continue to be active.

◆Set goals. Set short-term and long-term goals. A short-term goal may be to walk 5 to 10 minutes, 5 days a week. It may not seem like a lot, but any activity is better than none. A long-term goal may be to do at least 30 minutes of physical activity at a moderate-intensity level (one that makes you breathe harder but does not overwork or overheat you) on most days of the week. You can break up your physical activity in shorter segments of 10 minutes or more.

◆Set rewards. Whether your goal was to be active for 15 minutes a day, to walk farther than you did last week, or simply to stay positive, you deserve recognition for your efforts. Some ideas for rewards include a new CD to motivate you, new walking shoes, or a new outfit.

◆Get support. Get a family member or friend to be physically active with you. It may be more fun, and your buddy can cheer you on and help you stick with it.

◆Track progress. Keep a journal of your physical activity. You may not feel like you are making progress but when you look back at where you started, you may be pleasantly surprised! You can make copies of the blank journal at the end of this booklet to keep track of your efforts.

 

Active at Any Size Day 1: Healthy, fit bodies come in all sizes

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on August 1, 2012 at 8:00 am

 

Active at Any Size

Healthy, fit bodies come in all sizes. Whatever your size or shape, get physically active now and keep moving for a healthier you!

WOULD you like to be more physically active, but are not sure if you can do it?
Good news—if you are a very large person, you can be physically active—and you can have fun and feel good doing it.
THERE may be special challenges for very large people who are physically active. You may not be able to bend or move in the same way that other people can. It may be hard to find clothes and equipment for exercising. You may feel self-conscious being physically active around other people.
Facing these challenges is hard—but it can be done! The information in this booklet may help you start being more active and healthier—no matter what your size!

Over two-thirds of adults in the United States are overweight or obese, and over one-third are obese, according to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) .

Why should I be active?
BEING physically active may help you live longer and protect you from:
◆ type 2 diabetes
◆heart disease
◆ stroke
◆high blood pressure
If you have any of these health problems, being physically active may help improve your symptoms.

REGULAR physical activity helps you feel better
because it:
◆ Lowers your stress and boosts your mood.
◆ Increases your strength, movement, balance, and flexibility.
◆Helps control blood pressure and blood sugar.
◆Helps build healthy bones, muscles, and joints.
◆Helps your heart and lungs work better.
◆ Improves your self-esteem.
◆Boosts energy during the day and may aid in sleep at night.

How do I get started?

We will be posting new ways everyday for next few days on how to be more active even with extra weight on your body. See you tomorrow.

 

Weight-loss and Nutrition Myths: Day 2

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on July 18, 2012 at 8:00 am

 

Myth: High-protein/low-carbohydrate diets are a healthy way to lose weight.

Fact: The long-term health effects of a high-protein/low-carbohydrate diet are unknown. But getting most of your daily calories from high-protein foods like meat, eggs, and cheese is not a balanced eating plan. You may be eating too much fat and cholesterol, which may raise heart disease risk. You may be eating too few fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, which may lead to constipation due to lack of dietary fiber. Following a high-protein/low-carbohydrate diet may also make you feel nauseous, tired, and weak. Eating fewer than 130 grams of carbohydrate a day can lead to the buildup of ketones in your blood. Ketones are partially broken-down fats. A buildup of these in your blood (called ketosis) can cause your body to produce high levels of uric acid, which is a risk factor for gout (a painful swelling of the joints) and kidney stones. Ketosis may be especially risky for pregnant women and people with diabetes or kidney disease. Be sure to discuss any changes in your diet with a health care professional, especially if you have health conditions such as cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, or type 2 diabetes.

Tip: High-protein/low-carbohydrate diets are often low in calories because food choices are strictly limited, so they may cause short-term weight loss. But a reduced-calorie eating plan that includes recommended amounts of carbohydrate, protein, and fat will also allow you to lose weight. By following a balanced eating plan, you will not have to stop eating whole classes of foods, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables—and miss the key nutrients they contain. You may also find it easier to stick with a diet or eating plan that includes a greater variety of foods.

 

Weight-loss and Nutrition Myths: Day 1

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on July 17, 2012 at 8:00 am

 

Weighing too much may increase your risk for developing many health problems. If you are overweight or obese, you may be at risk for:

  • type 2 diabetes
  • coronary heart disease and stroke
  • metabolic syndrome
  • certain types of cancer
  • sleep apnea
  • osteoarthritis
  • gallbladder disease
  • fatty liver disease
  • pregnancy complications

You may be able to lower your health risks by losing weight, doing regular physical activity, and eating healthfully.

“Lose 30 pounds in 30 days!”
“Eat as much as you want and still lose weight!”
“Try the thigh buster and lose inches fast!”
And so on, and so on. With so many products and weight loss theories out there, it is easy to get confused.

Myth: Fad diets work for permanent weight loss.

The phrases food faddism and fad diet originally referred to idiosyncratic diets and eating patterns that promote short-term weight loss, usually with no concern for long-term weight maintenance, and enjoy temporary popularity. “Fad diet” is a term of popular media, not science

Fact: Fad diets are not the best way to lose weight and keep it off. Fad diets often promise quick weight loss or tell you to cut certain foods out of your diet. You may lose weight at first on one of these diets. But diets that strictly limit calories or food choices are hard to follow. Most people quickly get tired of them and regain any lost weight.

Fad diets may be unhealthy because they may not provide all of the nutrients your body needs. Also, losing weight at a very rapid rate (more than 3 pounds a week after the first couple of weeks) may increase your risk for developing gallstones (clusters of solid material in the gallbladder that can be painful). Diets that provide less than 800 calories per day also could result in heart rhythm abnormalities, which can be fatal.

Tip: Research suggests that losing 1/2 to 2 pounds a week by making healthy food choices, eating moderate portions, and building physical activity into your daily life is the best way to lose weight and keep it off. By adopting healthy eating and physical activity habits, you may also lower your risk for developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure.

 

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