Let us Learn about Health and Healthcare

Posts Tagged ‘Conditions and Diseases’

When to worry about a fever?

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on August 22, 2013 at 3:09 pm
has-your-kid-got-a-fever
What is a fever? — A fever is a rise in body temperature that goes above a certain level. The level that is considered a fever depends on how you take the temperature. Here are the values that are considered a fever:
  • Oral (mouth) temperature above 100ºF (37.8ºC)
  • Armpit temperature above 99ºF (37.2ºC)
  • Ear temperature above 100.4ºF (38ºC) in rectal mode or 99.5ºF (37.5ºC) in oral mode
  • Forehead temperature above 100.4ºF (38ºC)
  • Rectal temperature above 100.4ºF (38ºC)

 

What is the best way to take my temperature? — Armpit, ear, and forehead temperatures are easier to measure than rectal or oral temperatures, but they are not as accurate.

Here is the right way to take an oral temperature:

  • Wait at least 30 minutes after you eat or drink anything hot or cold.
  • Wash the thermometer with cool water and soap. Then rinse it.
  • Place the tip of the thermometer under your tongue toward the back. Hold the thermometer with your lips, not your teeth.
  • Keep your lips closed around the thermometer. A glass thermometer takes about 3 minutes to work. Most digital thermometers take less than 1 minute.

 

The height of the temperature is less important than how sick you feel. If you think you have a fever and you feel sick, your doctor or nurse might want you to double-check by getting an oral or rectal temperature.

What causes fever? — The most common cause of fever in adults is infection. Common infections that can cause fever include:

  • A cold or the flu
  • An airway infection, such as bronchitis
  • A stomach bug

 

Most of these infections are not serious and get better on their own.

When should I see a doctor or nurse? — Call your doctor or nurse if you get a fever and you:

  • Are pregnant
  • Recently got back from a trip to Africa, Asia, or Latin America
  • Just got out of the hospital, or had surgery or another medical procedure
  • Get infections often
  • Are on chemotherapy – Call your doctor or nurse if your oral temperature goes above 100ºF (37.8ºC) for more than 1 hour. Also call if it goes above 101ºF (38.3ºC) even just 1 time.

 

You should also call if you have:

  • Fever that lasts several days or keeps coming back
  • A recent bite from an insect called a tick – Infections you can catch from tick bites can cause fever and other symptoms.
  • A serious health condition, such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer, lupus, or sickle cell anemia
  • Fever plus 1 or more of these symptoms:
  • Rash
  • Trouble breathing
  • Severe headache or neck pain
  • Seizure or confusion
  • Severe vomiting or diarrhea
  • Severe pain in the belly, back, or sides
  • Any other symptom that is unusual or worries you

 

Will I need tests? — Maybe. Your doctor or nurse will do an exam and talk with you about your symptoms. You might also have the following tests:

  • Blood tests
  • Urine tests
  • Chest X-ray or CT scan – These imaging tests create pictures of the inside of the body.

 

Your doctor or nurse will talk to you about any other tests you might need.

Can I do anything on my own to feel better? — Yes. You can stay home, rest, and drink plenty of fluids. You can also take acetaminophen (sample brand name: Tylenol) to relieve fever.

How are fevers treated? — That depends on the cause. Many people do not need treatment. If you do, treatments can include:

  • Antibiotics to fight the infection. But antibiotics only work on infections caused by bacteria, not infections caused by viruses. For example, antibiotics will NOT work on a cold.
  • Medicines, such as acetaminophen (sample brand name: Tylenol) or ibuprofen (sample brand names: Advil, Motrin). These medicines can help bring down a fever. But they are not always necessary.

Source: Uptodate

Advertisements

COMMON COLD: EVERYONE GETS IT

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on August 17, 2013 at 3:08 pm

COLDWhat causes coughs, runny noses, and other symptoms of the common cold? — These symptoms are usually caused by a viral infection. Lots of viruses can take hold inside your nose, mouth, throat, or lungs, and cause cold symptoms.

Most people get over a cold without lasting problems. Even so, having a cold can be uncomfortable. And if your child has a cold, it is hard to know when the symptoms call for a trip to the doctor.

What are the symptoms of the common cold? — The symptoms include:

  • Sneezing
  • Coughing
  • Sniffling and runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Chest congestion

 

In children, the common cold can also cause a fever. But adults do not usually get a fever when they have a cold.

How can I tell if I have a cold or the flu? — The common cold and the flu both cause many of the same symptoms. But they also have some important differences.

Is it a cold or the flu?
Cold Flu
Symptoms
Fever Rare Usual; high (100°F to 102°F; occasionally higher, especially in young children); lasts 3 to 4 days
Headache Rare Common
General aches, pains Slight Usual; often severe
Fatigue, weakness Sometimes Usual; can last up to 2 to 3 weeks
Extreme exhaustion Never Usual; at the beginning of the illness
Stuffy nose Common Sometimes
Sneezing Usual Sometimes
Sore throat Common Sometimes
Chest discomfort, cough Mild to moderate; hacking cough Common; can become severe
Treatment Antihistamines

Decongestant

Pain/fever reliever (eg, ibuprofen/Motrin®), naproxen/Aleve®, acetaminophen/Tylenol®

Antiviral medicines – see your doctor

Pain/fever reliever (eg, ibuprofen/Motrin®), naproxen/Aleve®, acetaminophen/Tylenol®

Prevention Wash your hands often

Avoid close contact with anyone with a cold

Annual vaccination; antiviral medicine – see your doctor

Wash your hands often

Avoid close contact with anyone who has the flu

Complications Sinus congestion

Middle ear infection

Asthma

Bronchitis

Bronchitis, pneumonia; can be life threatening

When should I call the doctor or nurse? — Most people who have a cold do not need to see the doctor or nurse. But you should call your doctor or nurse if you have:

  • A fever of more than 100.4º F (38º C) that comes with shaking chills, loss of appetite, or trouble breathing
  • A fever and also have lung disease, such as emphysema
  • A cough that lasts longer than 10 days
  • Chest pain when you cough, trouble breathing, or coughing up blood

 

If you are older than 75, you should also call your doctor or nurse any time you get a long-lasting cough.

Take your child to the emergency room if he or she:

  • Becomes confused or stops responding to you
  • Has trouble breathing or has to work hard to breathe

 

Call your child’s doctor or nurse if he or she:

  • Refuses to drink anything for a long time
  • Is younger than 3 months
  • Has a fever and is not acting like him- or herself
  • Has a stuffed or runny nose that gets worse or does not get better after 2 weeks
  • Has red eyes or yellow goop coming out of his or her eyes
  • Has ear pain, pulls at his or her ears, or shows other signs of having an ear infection

 

What can I do to feel better? — If you are an adult, you can try cough and cold medicines that you can get without a prescription. These medicines might help with your symptoms. But they won’t cure your cold, or help you to feel better faster.

If you decide to try nonprescription cold medicines, be sure to follow the directions on the label. Do not combine two or more medicines that have acetaminophen in them. If you take too much acetaminophen, the drug can damage your liver. Also, if you have a heart condition, or you take prescription medicines, ask your pharmacist if it is safe to take the cold medicine you have in mind.

What should I know if my child has a cold? — In children, the common cold is often more severe than it is in adults. It also lasts longer. Plus, children often get a fever during the first three days of a cold.

Are cough and cold medicines safe for children? — If your child is younger than 6, you should NOT give him or her any cold medicines. These medicines are not safe for young children. Even if your child is older than 6, cough and cold medicines are unlikely to help.

NEVER give aspirin to any child younger than 18 years old. In children, aspirin can cause a life-threatening condition called Reye syndrome. When giving your child acetaminophen or other nonprescription medicines, never give more than the recommended dose.

How long will I be sick? — Colds usually last 3 to 7 days, but some people have symptoms for up to 2 weeks.

Can the common cold lead to more serious problems? — In very few cases, yes. In some people having a cold can lead to:

  • Pneumonia or bronchitis (infections of the lungs)
  • Ear infections (in children)
  • Other infections

 

How can I keep from getting another cold? — The most important thing you can do is to wash your hands often with soap and water. Alcohol hand rubs work well, too. The germs that cause the common cold can live on tables, door handles, and other surfaces for at least two hours. You never know when you might be touching germs. That’s why it’s so important to clean your hands often.

Solving your Insomnia

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on November 26, 2012 at 10:19 am

Sleep is something you normally look forward to. A time to rest and recharge your batteries, to take you into the next day alert and full of energy. However, sometimes the process of sleeping may be arduous and less than restful.

Most people experience periods when they find it difficult to sleep. Perhaps you’re stressed, or travelling from a different time zone, or just don’t know why you can’t sleep. These times are transitory and are little more than an inconvenience.

However, your periods of sleeplessness may become more than transitory and develop into a recurring pattern when you are trying to get to sleep.

There are basically three types of insomnia:

Initial sleep difficulties:

You have difficulty falling asleep when you first go to bed.

Intermediate sleep difficulties:

You fall asleep when you first go to bed, but awaken in the middle of the night. Once you awaken you find it difficult to return to sleep.

Early morning awakening:

You sleep throughout the night, but awaken much earlier than you normally would, feeling unrefreshed and sleepy. Typically you’re not able to return to sleep.

There could be many reasons why you are experiencing insomnia, but eventually the insomnia becomes a habit – a faulty sleeping strategy, as it were.

Develop a healthy sleeping strategy

Deal with any underlying issues contributing to your insomnia.

What was happening in your life when the insomnia first started?

Was there a trigger point for the insomnia, and is this still an issue for you?

Do you eat a meal too close to your bedtime?

Going to sleep on a full stomach is not a good idea. You can feel uncomfortable and the process of digestion may interfere with your ability to fall asleep. Ideally, you should not eat for two to three hours prior to going to bed.

Do you drink a caffeine drink before bed?

This may seem so obvious, but you may be surprised by the number of people who come for therapy for insomnia who drink coffee or some other caffeinated drink just before going to bed. Remember – caffeine is a stimulant that keeps you awake. If you have a drink before going to bed, make sure that you look at the label of what you are drinking to ensure that it is caffeine free.

Do you nap during the day?

If you do, you could be using up your quota of sleep before you get to bed. Try cutting out the napping and see what happens to your sleep.

Do you drink alcohol close to your bedtime?

You may think that a little night-time tipple helps you to sleep. Wrong! Even though alcohol is basically an anesthetic, it can act as a stimulant in small doses. So have your last alcoholic drink a couple of hours before going to sleep. Oh, and don’t think that you can drink more alcohol so that you are anaesthetized into sleep! Alcohol-induced sleep is not the same as natural sleep and you still wake up unrefreshed in the morning.

Are you overestimating the amount of sleep you think you need?

Try going to bed a little later. See what happens.

Banning anything except sleep from the bedroom.

That means no eating, drinking, watching TV, reading, or sex when in bed. You want tore-associate the bed with sleep and only sleep. Any other activity can be done elsewhere – and that includes sex, so why not spice up your relationship and get amorous in the kitchen or the living room? And don’t worry, once you’re sleeping well then all these activities can once again return to the boudoir.

Going to bed at the same time each night.

Develop a regular pattern.

Getting up and doing something else if you can’t sleep.

If you awaken and aren’t able to get to sleep again, get out of bed and go and do some-thing else. The great hypnotherapist Milton Erickson had his insomnia patients polish their kitchen floor over and over again, no matter what the time of night it was! When you’re feeling sleepy again, return to your bed. By doing this you associate your bed with sleepiness and eventually sleep.

Writing down any worries or concerns before you go to bed.

This is called externalizing. Writing down any worries or concerns helps to remove them from your mind, increasing your chance of focusing on sleep, rather than stress.

 

 

Want to Quit Smoking: What to do?

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on November 14, 2012 at 11:51 am

Plan the right time to quit.

Think about a good time to quit. Make sure that you plan to quit at a time when your life is going to be reasonably stable – when you have no major events over the coming month or two such as getting married, birthday parties, exams, holidays such as Christmas, and so on. On the other hand, many people find that quitting just before they go on holiday is a great time to do it, as the change of scenery and lack of all those familiar smoking triggers can reinforce their new non-smoking habit.

 

Tell people, who you know are supportive, that you’re quitting.

It’s always nice to have support and encouragement. These are the people you know you can turn to when your resolve is wavering, or who you know will give you those little words of encouragement just when you need them. Avoid at all costs those who would delight in your failure!

 

Get rid of all your smoking paraphernalia just before your hypnotherapy session.

Throw out your ashtrays, your lighters, and your stash of emergency cigarettes. You won’t need them any more. Once they are gone they won’t be there to tempt you from the straight and narrow. And ensure that your home becomes a strict no smoking zone.

 

Do something that you know will increase your motivation to quit.

You’re motivated, but what else can you do that cranks up that motivation? Half-fill a jam jar with water and drop your old dog ends into it after you smoke each cigarette. Every so often, shake it up and smell the mixture. Nice! That’s what’s going on in your body each time you smoke. Or take another jam jar and each time you buy a packet of cigarettes put the equivalent amount of money into it. At the end of the week count it up and see how much you are spending on ruining your health. And then think how much you save once you have stopped. Plan to do something nice with that money.

 

MUST STRETCH AFTER WORKOUT

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on November 8, 2012 at 9:55 am

Stretch gently after you warm up your muscles, and again after you cool down. Try doing the stretches listed below. Do not bounce or hold your breath when you stretch. Perform slow movements and stretch only as far as you feel comfortable.

Side Reach

Illustration demonstrating sidestrech

Reach one arm over your head and to the side. Keep your hips steady and your shoulders straight to the side. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat on the other side.

Wall Push

Illustration demonstrating the wall push

 

Lean your hands on a wall and place your feet about 3 to 4 feet away from the wall. Bend one knee and point it toward the wall. Keep your back leg straight with your foot flat and your toes pointed straight ahead. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat with the other leg.

Knee Pull

Illustration demonstrating the knee pull

Lean your back against a wall. Keep your head, hips, and feet in a straight line. Pull one knee toward your chest, hold for 10 seconds, and then repeat with the other leg.

Leg Curl

Illustration demonstrating the leg curl

Pull your right foot toward your buttocks with your right hand. Stand straight and keep your bent knee pointing straight down. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat with your other foot and hand.

Hamstring Stretch

Illustration demonstrating hamstring strech

Sit on a sturdy bench or hard surface so that one leg is stretched out on the bench with your toes pointing up. Keep your other foot flat on the surface below. Straighten your back, and if you feel a stretch in the back of your thigh, hold for 10 seconds and then change sides and repeat. If you do not feel a stretch, slowly lean forward from your hips until you feel a stretch.

 

Relaxing Moments: Peaceful Wind Chimes Meditation

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on October 30, 2012 at 9:33 am

Wind Chimes Relaxation Sounds for 1 Hour

When you add wind chimes to your porch or patio, you bring a new dimension into your outdoor space. The sound of the metal or wooden chimes adds gentle ambiance. There are actually many reasons that the gentle, tinkling is used. Some of these include:

• Soothing — the calming and soothing effects will provide peaceful background noise while you work or play outside.
• Health — there is evidence that the chiming sound created by wind improves health.
• Comfort — the gentle sound will comfort a troubled mind.

It is well known that certain types of music can be beneficial to patients who have high-blood pressure or heart conditions. As a light breeze blows, the wind chime peels its jingling strains in your backyard. To sit and listen will encourage total relaxation, which can be beneficial for many health problems. The psychological benefits actually work to benefit the physical ailments.

There are several places where a wind chime is ideal. You will want to securely attach the apparatus to a roof, beam, rafter or overhang. For this, a simple C-shaped hook that screws into wood usually works well.

You may enjoy your chime in many situations in your yard and around your property. Consider installing yours where you will be able to enjoy it. For example:

• A deck is one of the most obvious places that will be an accessible location where you can hang your chime. You will enjoy the music the breeze creates when you sit and watch the sunset from your deck or when you just sit in the shade to enjoy the fresh air.
• Hang one of these natural instruments near your garden area. You will commune with nature as you dig in earth to the accompaniment of the strains moved into music by the wind.
• A swimming pool or dining area is a great place to enjoy your wind chime. Imagine floating in a pool chair with the tinkling of chimes in the breeze, or having that gentle, natural background music to set the tone for your outdoor dining area.

Many people hang wind chimes on their property. The most popular ones available are made from wood or metal. Often, these are hollow tubes that clink together to create the attractive noise that peels through the air and brings pleasure while you enjoy or work in your yard.

 

Weight Management and Gallstones

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on October 26, 2012 at 6:44 am

It is estimated that digestive diseases affect 60 to 70 million people in the United States. Gallbladder disease is one of the more common of these diseases. Experts estimate that as many as 20 million Americans have gallstones.

Most people with gallstones do not know that they have them and experience no symptoms. These people may have painless gallstones, or silent gallstones. Sometimes gallstones cause abdominal or back pain. These are called symptomatic gallstones. In rare cases, gallstones can cause serious health problems. Hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations and operations occur annually as a result of gallstones.

What are gallstones?

Gallstones are clusters of solid material that form in the gallbladder. The most common type is made mostly of cholesterol. Gallstones may occur as one large stone or as many small ones. They vary in size and may be as large as a golf ball or as small as a grain of sand.

Gallstones develop in the gallbladder, a small pear-shaped organ located beneath the liver on the right side of the abdomen. The gallbladder is about 3 inches long and 1 inch wide at its thickest part. It stores and releases bile into the intestine to help digestion.

Bile is a liquid made by the liver. It contains water, cholesterol, bile salts, fats, proteins, and bilirubin (a bile pigment). During digestion, the gallbladder contracts to release bile into the intestine, where the bile salts help to break down fat. Bile also dissolves excess cholesterol.

What causes gallstones to develop?

Illustration of the gallbladder and adjoining organs, the liver, pancreas, and duodenum.

According to researchers, cholesterol gallstones may form in several ways, such as:

When bile contains more cholesterol than it can dissolve.

When there is too much bilirubin or other substance in the bile that causes cholesterol to form hard crystals.
When there are not enough bile salts to break down fat and when the gallbladder does not contract and empty its bile regularly.

 

What are the symptoms of gallstones?

Some common symptoms of gallstones or gallstone attack include:

Severe pain in the upper abdomen that starts suddenly and lasts from 30 minutes to many hours.
Pain under the right shoulder or in the right shoulder blade.
Nausea or vomiting.
Indigestion after eating high-fat foods, such as fried foods or desserts.

Is obesity a risk factor for gallstones?

Obesity is a strong risk factor for gallstones, especially among women. People who are obese are more likely to have gallstones than people who are at a healthy weight. Obesity in adults can be defined using the body mass index (BMI), a tool that measures weight in relation to height. The table below shows how the BMI calculation works. A BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 refers to a healthy weight, a BMI of 25 to 29.9 refers to overweight, and a BMI of 30 or higher refers to obesity.

As BMI increases, the risk for developing gallstones also rises. Studies have shown that risk may triple in women who have a BMI greater than 32 compared to those with a BMI of 24 to 25. The risk may be seven times higher in women with a BMI above 45 than in those with a BMI below 24.

Researchers have found that people who are obese may produce high levels of cholesterol. This leads to the production of bile containing more cholesterol than it can dissolve. When this happens, gallstones can form. People who are obese may also have large gallbladders that do not empty normally or completely. Some studies have shown that men and women who carry fat around their midsections may be at a greater risk for developing gallstones than those who carry fat around their hips and thighs.

Is weight-loss dieting a risk factor for gallstones?

Weight-loss dieting increases the risk of developing gallstones. People who lose a large amount of weight quickly are at greater risk than those who lose weight at a slower pace. Rapid weight loss may also cause silent gallstones (painless gallstones) to become symptomatic. Studies have shown that people who lose more than 3 pounds per week may have a greater risk of developing gallstones than those who lose weight at slower rates.

A very low-calorie diet (VLCD) allows a person who is obese to quickly lose a large amount of weight. VLCDs usually provide about 800 calories per day in food or liquid form, and are followed for 12 to 16 weeks under the supervision of a health care professional. Studies have shown that 10 to 25 percent of people on a VLCD developed gallstones. These gallstones were usually silent—they did not produce any symptoms. About one-third of the dieters who developed gallstones, however, did have symptoms and some of these required gallbladder surgery.

Experts believe weight-loss dieting may cause a shift in the balance of bile salts and cholesterol in the gallbladder. The cholesterol level is increased and the amount of bile salts is decreased. Following a diet too low in fat or going for long periods without eating (skipping breakfast, for example), a common practice among dieters, may also decrease gallbladder contractions. If the gallbladder does not contract often enough to empty out the bile, gallstones may form.

A drug called ursodiol that helps dissolve cholesterol in the bile may help prevent gallstones from developing during rapid weight loss. While ursodiol is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent gallstones, its “off-label” use (the practice of prescribing medications for periods of time or for conditions not FDA-approved) has been shown to be effective and safe. If rapid weight loss is highly likely, you should consider talking with your health care provider about using ursodiol.

Is weight cycling a risk factor for gallstones?

Weight cycling, or losing and regaining weight repeatedly, may increase the risk of developing gallstones. People who weight cycle—especially with losses and gains of more than 10 pounds—have a higher risk for gallstones than people who lose weight and maintain their weight loss. Additionally, the more weight a person loses and regains during a cycle, the greater the risk of developing gallstones.

Why weight cycling is a risk factor for gallstones is unclear. The rise in cholesterol levels during the weight-loss phase of a weight cycle may be responsible. It is also thought that each cycle increases one’s risk for gallstones. However, further research is required to determine the exact link between weight loss and the risk for gallstones.

Is surgery to treat obesity a risk factor for gallstones?

Gallstones are common among people who undergo bariatric surgery to lose weight. Bariatric surgery to reduce the size of the stomach or bypass parts of the digestive system is a weight-loss method for people who have a BMI above 40. This procedure is also an option for people who have a BMI above 35 with comorbid conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Experts estimate that about one-third of patients who have bariatric surgery develop gallstones. The gallstones usually develop in the first few months after surgery and are symptomatic.

How can I safely lose weight and decrease the risk of gallstones?

You can take several measures to decrease the risk of developing gallstones during weight loss. Losing weight gradually, instead of losing a large amount of weight quickly, lowers your risk. Depending on your starting weight, experts recommend losing weight at the rate of 1/2 to 2 pounds per week. Losing weight at this rate commonly occurs for up to 6 months. After 6 months, weight loss usually declines and weight stabilizes because individuals in lower weight groups use fewer calories (energy). You can also decrease the risk of gallstones associated with weight cycling by aiming for a modest weight loss that you can maintain. Even a loss of 5 to 10 percent of body weight over a period of 6 months or more can improve the health of an adult who is overweight or obese.

Your food choices can also affect your gallstone risk. Experts recommend including some fat in your diet to stimulate gallbladder contracting and emptying. Current recommendations indicate that 20 to 35 percent of your total calories should come from fat. Studies have also shown that diets high in fiber and calcium may reduce the risk of gallstone development.

Finally, regular physical activity is related to a lower risk for gallstones. Aim for approximately 60 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity on most days of the week to manage your body weight and prevent unhealthy weight gain. To sustain weight loss, engage in at least 60 to 90 minutes of daily moderate-intensity physical activity.

What is the treatment for gallstones?

Silent gallstones are usually left alone and sometimes disappear on their own. Symptomatic gallstones are usually treated. The most common treatment is surgery to remove the gallbladder. This operation is called a cholecystectomy. In other cases, nonsurgical approaches—drugs—are used to dissolve the gallstones. Your health care professional can help determine which option is best for you.

Are the benefits of weight loss greater than the risk of getting gallstones?

Although weight loss increases the risk of developing gallstones, obesity poses an even greater risk. In addition to gallstones, obesity is linked to many serious health problems, including:

type 2 diabetes
high blood pressure
heart disease
stroke
certain types of cancer
sleep apnea (when breathing stops for short periods during sleep)
osteoarthritis (wearing away of the joints)
fatty liver disease
For people who are obese, weight loss can lower the risk of developing some of these illnesses. Even a small weight loss of 10 percent of body weight over a period of 6 months can improve health and lower disease risk. In addition, weight loss may bring other benefits such as better mood, increased energy, and positive self-image.

If you are thinking about starting an eating and physical activity plan to lose weight, talk with your health care professional first. Together, you can discuss various eating and physical activity programs, your medical history, and the benefits and risks of losing weight, including the risk of developing gallstones.

 

11 Simple & Effective ways to Super-Boost your Immunity

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on October 5, 2012 at 9:39 am

11 Simple Effective ways to Super-Boost your Immunity

What is immunity?

The immune system protects the body from possibly harmful substances by recognizing and responding to antigens. Antigens are substances (usually proteins) on the surface of cells, viruses, fungi, or bacteria. Nonliving substances such as toxins, chemicals, drugs, and foreign particles (such as a splinter) can also be antigens. The immune system recognizes and destroys substances that contain antigens.

Your own body’s cells have proteins that are antigens. These include a group of antigens called HLA antigens. Your immune system learns to see these antigens as normal and usually does not react against them.

So, how can you Super-Boost your Immunity?

1. Sleep for no more than 8 hours and no less than 6 hours.

2. Drink at least 8 glasses of water daily, totaling 64 ounce.

3. Take over-the-counter vitamin C pill daily especially during the change of season.

4. Deep breathing: Enhances the vitality of the internal organs and detoxifies the blood.

5. Exercise regularly at least 3-4 times a week with a minimum of 20 min of aerobic activity.

6. Meditation: Relaxes the mind and muscles, improves oxygen uptake, improves bone marrow functions and overall improves immunity.

7. Kill the stress: Stress is the most common cause for reduced immunity.  Try to stay more happy, calm and relaxed.  Avoid getting angry.  Whenever stressed, take a moment and say to yourself 3 times “Relax…… Relax…….. Relax…..”.

8. Listen to calming music.

9. Stretch your body.  Avoid sitting or standing for long hours.  Make sure you take a break every 30-45 minutes to stretch your body.

10.  Do your best and leave the rest.  We cannot control many things in her life.  So stop controlling the outcomes.  Make sure you perform your best with good thoughts and actions.  That is the most important thing in life.

11. Eat healthy: Fruits, fresh vegetables, whole grains and fish gives you abundant antioxidants, proteins  minerals and vitamins necessary to skyrocket the immune system.

Follow these 11 simple and effective ways to approach your immunity for a week and see the big difference in yourself.  You will feel much stronger in your mind and body.

How physically active is the U.S. population?

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on September 12, 2012 at 1:05 pm

 How physically active is the U.S. population?

 

 Only 31 percent of U.S. adults report that they engage in regular leisure-time physical activity (defined as either three sessions per week of vigorous physical activity lasting 20 minutes or more, or five sessions per week of light-to-moderate physical activity lasting 30 minutes or more). About 40 percent of adults report no leisure-time physical activity.

About 35 percent of high school students report that they participate in at least 60 minutes of physical activity on 5 or more days of the week, and only 30 percent of students report that they attend physical education class daily. As children get older, participation in regular physical activity decreases dramatically.

In contrast to reported activity, when physical activity is measured by a device that detects movement, only about 3–5 percent of adults obtain 30 minutes of moderate or greater intensity physical activity on at least 5 days per week. Among youth, measured activity provides information on younger children than is available with reports and highlights the decline in activity from childhood to adolescence. For example, 42 percent of children age 6–11 obtain the recommended 60 minutes per day of physical activity, whereas only 8 percent of adolescents achieve this goal.

What are the benefits of physical activity?

Research suggests that physical activity may reduce the risk of many adverse health conditions, such as coronary heart disease, stroke, some cancers, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, and depression. In addition, physical activity can help reduce risk factors for conditions such as high blood pressure and blood cholesterol. Researchers believe that some physical activity is better than none, and additional health benefits can be gained by increasing the frequency, intensity, and duration of physical activity.

 

Diabetes: Things to Know

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on August 23, 2012 at 8:00 am

Did you know that diabetes can lead to heart attack and stroke, blindness, or kidney failure?

Too much glucose, a type of sugar, in your blood can cause diabetes problems over time. High blood glucose can cause heart and blood vessel disease, which can lead to heart attacks and strokes. Damage to the eyes can lead to loss of sight or blindness. Nerve damage and poor blood flow can cause foot problems, sometimes leading to amputation.

You can prevent or delay diabetes problems by keeping your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol under control.

How can I tell if I have diabetes problems?

You may have diabetes problems if

  • your blood pressure is 130 over 80, written as 130/80, or higher
  • you have pain in your chest
  • you have blurry or double vision, or feel pain or pressure in your eyes
  • you have foot problems-such as blisters, ingrown toenails, or cracked skin-that get infected
  • your arms, hands, legs, or feet feel numb, or you feel shooting pains

Some diabetes problems don’t have symptoms at first. For example, you cannot tell if your kidneys are damaged until they stop working altogether. Your doctor should test your urine every year to see how well your kidneys are working.

What can I do to stay healthy with diabetes?

Controlling your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol can make a big difference in staying healthy. Talk with your doctor about what your ABC goals should be and how to reach them. A stands for the A1C test-a measure of what your blood glucose has been for the last three months. B is for blood pressure, and C is for cholesterol.

You can take these steps each day to reach your ABC goals:

  • Follow the healthy eating plan that you and your doctor or dietitian have discussed.
  • Be physically active for 30 to 60 minutes most days.
  • Take your medicines as directed and keep taking them, even after you’ve reached your goals.
  • If you smoke, quit.
  • Ask your doctor if you should take aspirin to prevent a heart attack or stroke.
  • Check your feet every day for cuts, blisters, sores, swelling, redness, or sore toenails.
%d bloggers like this: