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Seeking treatment for Eating Disorders

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on September 18, 2012 at 8:00 am

Questions to Ask When Considering Treatment Options


There are various approaches to eating disorders treatment. It is important to find an option that is most effective for your needs.

Questions to Ask Your Treatment Provider
Once you have chosen a treatment provider, you may want to consider asking these questions in your first meeting.

Eating Disorders Survival Guide
Eating disorders can lead to significant physiological changes that require medical treatment in addition to psychiatric treatment and the reimbursement system does not allow for a holistic approach. For this reason, patients and families frequently have to fight to get the appropriate and necessary treatment.

Securing Eating Disorders Treatment: Ammunition for Arguments with Third Parties
Unfortunately, some patients and families frequently have to fight to get the appropriate and necessary treatment for eating disorders. Here are some arguments to use when trying to secure treatment from an insurance provider or another third party.

Substance Abuse and Eating Disorders
Research suggests that nearly 50% of individuals with an eating disorder (ED) are also abusing drugs and/or alcohol, a rate 5 times greater than what is seen in the general population according to the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

Suggested Medical Tests
A complete medical assessment is important when diagnosing eating disorders. Talk with your doctor about performing specific laboratory tests.

Sharing with EEEase
When you begin to notice that disordered eating habits are affecting your life, your happiness, and your ability to concentrate, it is important that you talk to somebody about what you’re going through.

Treatment of Eating Disorders
The most effective and long-lasting treatment for an eating disorder is some form of psychotherapy or counseling, coupled with careful attention to medical and nutritional needs. Ideally, this treatment should be tailored to the individual and will vary according to both the severity of the disorder and the patient’s individual problems, needs, and strengths.

What Should I Say? Tips for Talking to a Friend Who May Be Struggling with an Eating Disorder
If you are worried about your friend’s eating behaviors or attitudes, it is important to express your concerns in a loving and supportive way. It is also necessary to discuss your worries early on, rather than waiting until your friend has endured many of the damaging physical and emotional effects of eating disorders

Twelve Ideas for Negotiating the Holidays
The Holidays can be a time to spend with loved ones and a time to celebrate. They can also be a time when food and family can provoke anxiety and present triggers. This guide suggests a few ideas that may help you plan ahead and get your supports in place.

Source: http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/information-resources/general-information.php


Basics of Eating Disorders

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on September 17, 2012 at 8:00 am

Terms and definitions:


Anorexia, Bulimia, & Binge Eating Disorder: What is an Eating Disorder?

Eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder include extreme emotions, attitudes, and behaviors surrounding weight and food issues.

Anorexia Nervosa

Anorexia Nervosa is a serious, potentially life-threatening eating disorder characterized by self-starvation and excessive weight loss.Binge Eating Disorder
Binge Eating Disorder (BED) is a type of eating disorder not otherwise specified and is characterized by recurrent binge eating without the regular use of compensatory measures to counter the binge eating.

Bulimia Nervosa
Bulimia Nervosa is a serious, potentially life-threatening eating disorder characterized by a cycle of bingeing and compensatory behaviors such as self-induced vomiting designed to undo or compensate for the effects of binge eating.

Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS)
A person does not have to be diagnosed with Anorexia, Bulimia or BED to have an eating disorder. An eating disorder can include a combination of signs and symptoms but not meet the full criteria. Read more about the individual signs and symptoms in this handout.


Eating Disorders can be Prevented!
Eating disorders arise from a variety of physical, emotional, social issues, all of which need to be addressed for effective prevention and treatment.

50 Ways to Lose the 3Ds: Dieting, Drive for Thinness, and Body Dissatisfaction
Individuals involved with youth and adolescents, such as educators, parents, health professionals, and physicians can prevent the further development of issues and concerns regarding weight through their own actions and words of encouragement toward healthful eating practices and attitudes.

Factors that may contribute to eating disorders:

Factors that May Contribute to Eating Disorders
While eating disorders may begin with preoccupations with food and weight, they are most often about much more than food. NEDA acknowledges there may be a difference of opinion among experts and the literature on this topic and we encourage readers to explore the topic further, using all means available to them. 

Body image issues:

Body Image
Body image is how you see yourself when you look in the mirror or picture yourself in your mind.

Every Body is Different
Genetics influence bone structure, body size, shape, and weight differently in every person.

Listen to Your Body
Eat what you want, when you are truly hungry. Stop when you’re full. And eat exactly what appeals to you. Do this instead of any diet, and you are unlikely to ever have a weight problem, let alone an eating disorder. Eat when you are truly hungry. Stop when you are full.

No Weight!
Signing this declaration of independence from a weight-obsessed world may help you accept your body’s natural shape and size.

Ten “Will-Powers” for Improving Body Image
Taking care of your body and doing things you enjoy will enable you to enjoy a happy, participatory life.

Ten Steps To Positive Body Image
One list cannot automatically tell you how to turn negative body thoughts into positive body image, but it can help you think about new ways of looking more healthfully and happily at yourself and your body. The more you do that, the more likely you are to feel good about who you are and the body you naturally have.

The Media, Body Image, and Eating Disorders
Eating disorders are complex conditions that arise from a variety of factors, including physical, psychological, interpersonal, and social issues. Media images that help to create cultural definitions of beauty and attractiveness are often acknowledged as being among those factors contributing to the rise of eating disorders.

Twenty Ways to Love Your Body!
Think of your body as the vehicle to your dreams. Honor it. Respect it. Fuel it.

Health concerns:

Eating Concerns and Oral Health
Dietary habits can and do play a role in oral health. Everyone has heard from their dentist that eating too much sugar can lead to cavities, but did you know that high intake of acidic “diet” foods can have an equally devastating effect on your teeth?

Health Consequences of Eating Disorders
Eating disorders are real, complex, and devastating conditions that can have serious consequences for health, productivity, and relationships.

 Dieting: Risks and Reasons to Stop
Americans spend more than $40 billion dollars a year on dieting and diet-related products. What do we get for our money?

Laxative Abuse: Some Basic Facts
Laxative abuse is serious and dangerous – often resulting in a variety of health complications and sometimes causing life-threatening risks.


Orthorexia is a term coined by Steven Bratman, MD, to describe his own experience with food and eating.  It is not an officially recognized disorder, but is similar to other eating disorders – those with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa obsess about calories and weight while orthorexics obsess about healthy eating (not about being ‘thin’ and losing weight).
Not a recognized medical diagnosis, diabulimia refers to the condition in which an individual with an eating disorder, who also has diabetes, manipulates insulin levels to manage weight. It carries serious health consequences.
For more information about diabulimia and where you can find help, please contact our toll free information and referral helpline at 800-931-2237Tests and Screening
Primary care providers may be the first person to recognize and offer assistance regarding a patient’s eating and weight concerns. These questions and tests can help doctors with initial screening and diagnosis.


Weight-loss and Nutrition Myths: Day 14

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on July 30, 2012 at 8:00 am


Myth: “Going vegetarian” means you are sure to lose weight and be healthier.
Fact: Research shows that people who follow a vegetarian eating plan, on average, eat fewer calories and less fat than nonvegetarians. They also tend to have lower body weights relative to their heights than nonvegetarians. Choosing a vegetarian eating plan with a low fat content may be helpful for weight loss. But vegetarians—like nonvegetarians—can make food choices that contribute to weight gain, like eating large amounts of high-fat, high-calorie foods or foods with little or no nutritional value.
Vegetarian diets should be as carefully planned as nonvegetarian diets to make sure they are balanced. Nutrients that nonvegetarians normally get from animal products, but that are not always found in a vegetarian eating plan, are iron, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin B12, zinc, and protein.

Tip: Choose a vegetarian eating plan that is low in fat and that provides all of the nutrients your body needs. Food and beverage sources of nutrients that may be lacking in a vegetarian diet are listed below.
Iron: cashews, spinach, lentils, garbanzo beans, fortified bread or cereal
Calcium: dairy products, fortified soy-based beverages, tofu made with calcium sulfate, collard greens, kale, broccoli
Vitamin D: fortified foods and beverages including milk, soy-based beverages, or cereal
Vitamin B12: eggs, dairy products, fortified cereal or soy-based beverages, tempeh, miso (tempeh and miso are foods made from soybeans)
Zinc: whole grains (especially the germ and bran of the grain), nuts, tofu, leafy vegetables (spinach, cabbage, lettuce)
Protein: eggs, dairy products, beans, peas, nuts, seeds, tofu, tempeh, soy-based burgers


Weight-loss and Nutrition Myths: Day 9

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on July 25, 2012 at 8:00 am


Myth: Eating after 8 p.m. causes weight gain.
Fact: It does not matter what time of day you eat. It is what and how much you eat and how much physical activity you do during the whole day that determines whether you gain, lose, or maintain your weight. No matter when you eat, your body will store extra calories as fat.
Tip: If you want to have a snack before bedtime, think first about how many calories you have eaten that day. And try to avoid snacking in front of the TV at night—it may be easier to overeat when you are distracted by the television.


Weight-loss and Nutrition Myths: Day 8

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on July 24, 2012 at 8:00 am

Myth: Skipping meals is a good way to lose weight.

Fact: Studies show that people who skip breakfast and eat fewer times during the day tend to be heavier than people who eat a healthy breakfast and eat four or five times a day. This may be because people who skip meals tend to feel hungrier later on, and eat more than they normally would. It may also be that eating many small meals throughout the day helps people control their appetites.
Tip: Eat small meals throughout the day that include a variety of healthy, low-fat, low-calorie foods.

Weight-loss and Nutrition Myths: Day 5

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on July 21, 2012 at 8:00 am


Myth: “I can lose weight while eating whatever I want.”

Fact: To lose weight, you need to use more calories than you eat. It is possible to eat any kind of food you want and lose weight. You need to limit the number of calories you eat every day and/or increase your daily physical activity. Portion control is the key. Try eating smaller amounts of food and choosing foods that are low in calories.

Tip: When trying to lose weight, you can still eat your favorite foods—as long as you pay attention to the total number of calories that you eat.


Weight-loss and Nutrition Myths: Day 2

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on July 18, 2012 at 8:00 am


Myth: High-protein/low-carbohydrate diets are a healthy way to lose weight.

Fact: The long-term health effects of a high-protein/low-carbohydrate diet are unknown. But getting most of your daily calories from high-protein foods like meat, eggs, and cheese is not a balanced eating plan. You may be eating too much fat and cholesterol, which may raise heart disease risk. You may be eating too few fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, which may lead to constipation due to lack of dietary fiber. Following a high-protein/low-carbohydrate diet may also make you feel nauseous, tired, and weak. Eating fewer than 130 grams of carbohydrate a day can lead to the buildup of ketones in your blood. Ketones are partially broken-down fats. A buildup of these in your blood (called ketosis) can cause your body to produce high levels of uric acid, which is a risk factor for gout (a painful swelling of the joints) and kidney stones. Ketosis may be especially risky for pregnant women and people with diabetes or kidney disease. Be sure to discuss any changes in your diet with a health care professional, especially if you have health conditions such as cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, or type 2 diabetes.

Tip: High-protein/low-carbohydrate diets are often low in calories because food choices are strictly limited, so they may cause short-term weight loss. But a reduced-calorie eating plan that includes recommended amounts of carbohydrate, protein, and fat will also allow you to lose weight. By following a balanced eating plan, you will not have to stop eating whole classes of foods, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables—and miss the key nutrients they contain. You may also find it easier to stick with a diet or eating plan that includes a greater variety of foods.


Weight-loss and Nutrition Myths: Day 1

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on July 17, 2012 at 8:00 am


Weighing too much may increase your risk for developing many health problems. If you are overweight or obese, you may be at risk for:

  • type 2 diabetes
  • coronary heart disease and stroke
  • metabolic syndrome
  • certain types of cancer
  • sleep apnea
  • osteoarthritis
  • gallbladder disease
  • fatty liver disease
  • pregnancy complications

You may be able to lower your health risks by losing weight, doing regular physical activity, and eating healthfully.

“Lose 30 pounds in 30 days!”
“Eat as much as you want and still lose weight!”
“Try the thigh buster and lose inches fast!”
And so on, and so on. With so many products and weight loss theories out there, it is easy to get confused.

Myth: Fad diets work for permanent weight loss.

The phrases food faddism and fad diet originally referred to idiosyncratic diets and eating patterns that promote short-term weight loss, usually with no concern for long-term weight maintenance, and enjoy temporary popularity. “Fad diet” is a term of popular media, not science

Fact: Fad diets are not the best way to lose weight and keep it off. Fad diets often promise quick weight loss or tell you to cut certain foods out of your diet. You may lose weight at first on one of these diets. But diets that strictly limit calories or food choices are hard to follow. Most people quickly get tired of them and regain any lost weight.

Fad diets may be unhealthy because they may not provide all of the nutrients your body needs. Also, losing weight at a very rapid rate (more than 3 pounds a week after the first couple of weeks) may increase your risk for developing gallstones (clusters of solid material in the gallbladder that can be painful). Diets that provide less than 800 calories per day also could result in heart rhythm abnormalities, which can be fatal.

Tip: Research suggests that losing 1/2 to 2 pounds a week by making healthy food choices, eating moderate portions, and building physical activity into your daily life is the best way to lose weight and keep it off. By adopting healthy eating and physical activity habits, you may also lower your risk for developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure.


Being healthy is a BIG Deal!

In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on July 15, 2012 at 8:00 am

Being healthy is a big deal. Eating healthy foods and being active are good for you and your family.

Here are a few tips.

1. Eat breakfast every day! Breakfast gives you energy. It can help you at school and at play.

2.  Eat healthy foods. Try fresh fruits like apples and oranges. Eat vegetables like broccoli and carrots.

3.  Try not to eat too much fast food, like pizza and french fries.

4. Drink healthy drinks like water or milk. Try milk that is low in fat or fat-free. Try not to drink sugary drinks like soda.

5. Help your family shop for food. Ask if you can help fix a meal! Remind your family that it is important for everyone to eat healthy foods.

6.  Get active! Turn off your TV. Take a break from video games.

7. Play outside with your family, friends, or your pet. Kick a soccer ball around or jump rope. Just get moving!

8. Talk to your family about being healthy and having fun.


In Health, Healthcare, Medicine on June 30, 2012 at 8:00 am



Fact: An average 8-oz. serving of yogurt has 8 to 10 grams of protein and up to 35 percent of the recommended daily intake of Calcium.


The benefits of yogurt have been underestimated by most people. Yogurt has millions of healthy bacteria which are helpful for colon health. Colon is a very important organ to detoxify our body. These bacteria work in conjunction with each other to make sure we digest the food right and eliminate the toxins.

Eating yogurt 2-3 times a day with meals or as snacks will promote healing. It is a rich source of calcium, protein and vitamin d. It improves bone and muscle strength, improves immunity and improves joint functions.

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